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- Leonardo da Vinci

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  1. ageofdestruction:

odyssey: Sunset over the western Pacific, photographed from Apollo 13, April 1970.
Sequence of 9 Hasselblad photographs, starting over the central Pacific. As the Earth turns, eastern Asia (top) and Australia (bottom) come in to view.
Apollo 13 was launched on the 11th April. From the geography visible and sunset times for April 1970, I estimate the sequence covers 2-2.5 hours, most likely ending around 7:30am GMT on the 12th.
At 3am on the 14th, en route to the Moon, Apollo 13’s no. 2 oxygen tank exploded. The planned lunar landing was aborted, and scientists and engineers on the ground were forced to improvise a way to get the astronauts home alive in the damaged spacecraft. 
Apollo 13 finally returned to Earth on the 17th, splashing down in the southern Pacific - just left of twilight at the start of the sequence above.
Image credit: NASA/JSC, c/o LPI. Animation: AgeOfDestruction.

    ageofdestruction:

    odyssey: Sunset over the western Pacific, photographed from Apollo 13, April 1970.

    Sequence of 9 Hasselblad photographs, starting over the central Pacific. As the Earth turns, eastern Asia (top) and Australia (bottom) come in to view.

    Apollo 13 was launched on the 11th April. From the geography visible and sunset times for April 1970, I estimate the sequence covers 2-2.5 hours, most likely ending around 7:30am GMT on the 12th.

    At 3am on the 14th, en route to the Moon, Apollo 13’s no. 2 oxygen tank exploded. The planned lunar landing was aborted, and scientists and engineers on the ground were forced to improvise a way to get the astronauts home alive in the damaged spacecraft. 

    Apollo 13 finally returned to Earth on the 17th, splashing down in the southern Pacific - just left of twilight at the start of the sequence above.

    Image credit: NASA/JSC, c/o LPI. Animation: AgeOfDestruction.

    (via n-a-s-a)

  2. futurescope:

    Soft robotic Exoskeletons

    Harvard is working for DARPA’s Warrior Web program on a wearable robot/smart suit that will add power to your movements. The smart suit is intended to be worn under clothing and could boost the endurance and strength of everyone.

    Tom Cruises scifi future exoskeletons seems to be outdated. Outpaced by Innovation.

    The device, the Soft Exosuit, is intended to be worn comfortably under clothing and could enable soldiers to walk longer distances, keep fatigue at bay, and minimize the risk of injury when carrying heavy loads. Alternative versions of the suit could eventually assist those with limited mobility as well.

    DARPA’s Warrior Web program seeks to develop technologies to prevent and reduce musculoskeletal injuries for military personnel, but the same technologies could also have civilian applications. A reduction in such injuries could reduce long-term healthcare costs and enhance quality of life for wearers of the suit.

    [Wyss Institute]

  3. explorationimages:

Curiosity: Slopes of Mt. Sharp (Aeolis Mons), Sol 696 (July 22nd, 2014)

This image was taken by Mastcam: Left (MAST_LEFT) onboard NASA’s Mars rover Curiosity on Sol 696 (2014-07-22 08:07:04 UTC). 

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS
explorationimages:

Curiosity: Slopes of Mt. Sharp (Aeolis Mons), Sol 696 (July 22nd, 2014)

This image was taken by Mastcam: Left (MAST_LEFT) onboard NASA’s Mars rover Curiosity on Sol 696 (2014-07-22 08:07:04 UTC). 

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS
    High Resolution

    explorationimages:

    Curiosity: Slopes of Mt. Sharp (Aeolis Mons), Sol 696 (July 22nd, 2014)

    This image was taken by Mastcam: Left (MAST_LEFT) onboard NASA’s Mars rover Curiosity on Sol 696 (2014-07-22 08:07:04 UTC).
    Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS

    (via n-a-s-a)

  4. jtotheizzoe:

    astronautfilm:

    "An astronaut’s life is one of preparation and simulation, and training, and support from the ground, and anticipation, visualization, and very, very seldom - almost never - is an astronaut’s life about flying in space."


    - Canadian Astronaut Chris Hadfield; former Commander of the International Space Station

    There’s a really food metaphor for life in here.

    I think.

    (via b--rant)

  5. ralphewig:

Cyborg Power - once we extend our body’s capabilities with integrated electronics, how do we supply them with electricity? Although there is the option of charging implanted devices via contact/induction through the skin, powering them directly from the food we eat is a much more elegant approach. Organ mounted energy harvesters may be the solution: small charging circuits paired with nano size batteries, stitched to an internal organ (heart, lung, stomach, etc.) where they convert motion into electricity.

The new charger is an implantable piezoelectric strip that transforms kinetic energy into electricity. While surgery is required it to be installed, this little strip can already power a pacemaker when sewn directly onto the surface of your beating heart. Your lungs and diaphragm are also prime targets for these little in vivo power plants, since they’re organs that are in constant motion.
The piezoelectric power plants are comprised of lead zirconate titanate nanoribbons, housed in biocompatible plastic. There’s also an integrated rectifier that converts the electric signal and a tiny rechargeable battery, both encased in the same plastic. As of yet, the only living participant to have the implants sewn onto its heart has been an unwitting cow, and human trials are still a way off. So far, at least two units have been successfully mounted onto the same organ, boosting their combined output.


ralphewig:

Cyborg Power - once we extend our body’s capabilities with integrated electronics, how do we supply them with electricity? Although there is the option of charging implanted devices via contact/induction through the skin, powering them directly from the food we eat is a much more elegant approach. Organ mounted energy harvesters may be the solution: small charging circuits paired with nano size batteries, stitched to an internal organ (heart, lung, stomach, etc.) where they convert motion into electricity.

The new charger is an implantable piezoelectric strip that transforms kinetic energy into electricity. While surgery is required it to be installed, this little strip can already power a pacemaker when sewn directly onto the surface of your beating heart. Your lungs and diaphragm are also prime targets for these little in vivo power plants, since they’re organs that are in constant motion.
The piezoelectric power plants are comprised of lead zirconate titanate nanoribbons, housed in biocompatible plastic. There’s also an integrated rectifier that converts the electric signal and a tiny rechargeable battery, both encased in the same plastic. As of yet, the only living participant to have the implants sewn onto its heart has been an unwitting cow, and human trials are still a way off. So far, at least two units have been successfully mounted onto the same organ, boosting their combined output.
    High Resolution

    ralphewig:

    Cyborg Power - once we extend our body’s capabilities with integrated electronics, how do we supply them with electricity? Although there is the option of charging implanted devices via contact/induction through the skin, powering them directly from the food we eat is a much more elegant approach. Organ mounted energy harvesters may be the solution: small charging circuits paired with nano size batteries, stitched to an internal organ (heart, lung, stomach, etc.) where they convert motion into electricity.

    The new charger is an implantable piezoelectric strip that transforms kinetic energy into electricity. While surgery is required it to be installed, this little strip can already power a pacemaker when sewn directly onto the surface of your beating heart. Your lungs and diaphragm are also prime targets for these little in vivo power plants, since they’re organs that are in constant motion.

    The piezoelectric power plants are comprised of lead zirconate titanate nanoribbons, housed in biocompatible plastic. There’s also an integrated rectifier that converts the electric signal and a tiny rechargeable battery, both encased in the same plastic. As of yet, the only living participant to have the implants sewn onto its heart has been an unwitting cow, and human trials are still a way off. So far, at least two units have been successfully mounted onto the same organ, boosting their combined output.

    (via b--rant)

  6. typetoy:

http://www.agoodbook.de
typetoy:

http://www.agoodbook.de
    High Resolution
  7. CONTROLLER from Saman Kesh on Vimeo.

    ralphewig:

    Controller - a captivating scifi short film from Taiwan, where a young girl with the power to control things becomes the object of persecution by a corporation. In order to escape from her captors, she controls her own boy friend to rescue herself. The story is surprisingly multi-layered for the short duration, brought to life with deft craftsmanship. The key message is put just as succinctly: “Love is to be experienced, not controlled”.

    The self-rescuing damsel trope takes a sinister turn in Saman Kesh’s action-packed short Controller. A young woman is being held captive, so she takes control of her boyfriend’s body in order to rescue herself. Kesh wrote and directed this Taiwanese film, which feels in many places like a scifi anime brought to life. But the gorgeous cinematography lends a spooky and sometimes sad quality to the short.

    (via b--rant)


  8. High Resolution

    (Source: fax-the-facts, via b--rant)

  9. otakugangsta:

src